Regarded as one of the world’s great living experimental filmmakers, Weerasethakul  is a master of both slow and non-linear cinema. His idiosyncratic films are often set in his home province of Isan, Thailand. Isan’s myths, memories, tensions with neighbouring Laos, as well as the unquiet ghosts of Thailand’s conflicted, militarised history, energise his storytelling while imbuing it with an unworldliness. His work also reflects his interest in contemporary visual art (he is also known for his installations).

Mysterious Object at Noon

This first feature by Weerasethakul is a hybrid of fiction and drama where a folk story is slowly re-told and re-enacted through an exquisite corpse technique.  Screening at a number of major festivals including HKIFF and Vancouver, it was the film that launched his international reputation. “audaciously uncatergorisable” Criterion.

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Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives

This Cannes Palm d’Or winner secured Weerasethakul reputation as a master filmmaker, though the win was also not without some controversy.  In this film of high aesthetics, an old Thai farmer, Uncle Boonmee, is dying from kidney failure.  In these last days of his imperfect life, the veil between the mundane and the spirit world recedes bringing the dead and memories of past existences into the present.  “ (the) aura of the uncanny—the spirit life entering the everyday—is strangely affecting” The New Yorker.

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Cemetery of Splendour

In this film the spirt world again unfolds into the present.  A group of soldiers employed in digging up a building site for a government project fall ill with a mysterious kind of sleeping sickness. It is said they have disturbed the cemetery of dead kings, and the soldiers begin to channel both the kings and their old worlds.  “Sublime” The Guardian.

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